Abstract realities and disconnected memories are among the phenomena around which Astrid Kruse Jensen’s photographic works revolve. Landscapes and interiors which despite their relationship with reality are not specific. In the photographic process the motifs are displaced and the specific is dissolved by double exposures, backlight and slow shutter speeds. The works exist between dream and reality – in a metaphysical universe transcending time and space.

Medium: Archival fiber print

Mesurements:
60 x 58 cm
110 x 106 cm
140 x 135 cm
___________________________________________________________

In her earlier series Disappearing Into The Past and Within The Landscape, which were also created on Polaroid film, Kruse Jensen deliberately abandoned control of parts of the process. This is exactly where her interest lies, in the photographic and chemical process, where process and content are fused together. In this series Kruse Jensen works with Polaroid film, but she has now put the material more to the test than before. Through the use of double exposures, backlight and long shutter times where she creates movements of the camera, the specific space is dissolved and erased. The works appear almost painting-like and at the same time are definitively photographic. With this working method, concrete reality is challenged, so new realities arise as abstract motifs. The original subject disappears, is transformed and becomes abstract. We see this among other ways in her presentation of domestic interiors where the incoming light, double exposures and distortions of perspective create doubt in the viewer as to whether what we are looking at is real or a dream. The interiors become images of a state, more than of physical interiors.

In her work with photography Kruse Jensen has moved beyond the normal understanding of what photography is, and has experimented with its materiality in the form of photographs printed on fabric, and embroidered textual works created from what she calls impossible photographs, where embroidered words take their positions from the photographic subject. A particularly intimate motivic world arises for the viewer in these embroideries, taking place only in the world of ideas, instead of on the photographic paper.
The title of the exhibition refers to a fluid state between the real and the unreal, the controlled and the uncontrolled. So let yourself be carried away and swallowed up by Astrid Kruse Jensen’s motivic world, where the indefinable is defined and the unreality of reality takes control.